Posts Tagged With: plaque

Fitzrovia Chapel, London

Fitzrovia Chapel is another place I visited as part of Open House London last year, somewhere that had been on my radar since seeing some pictures on Instagram, and I was pleased to have my expectations exceeded. Designed by John Loughborough Pearson in 1891 it was built as a tranquil space for the staff and former patients of Middlesex Hospital but by the time the chapel was finished and opened in 1929 the hospital had been demolished.

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London Plaques – Part 3

Here’s another post about some of the plaques to be found around London. The first is on the site of the Westminster office of the Penny Post, on Gerrard Street, the first building to operate as a post office in Westminster in 1794. The London Penny Post itself was established in 1680 to deliver mail around London for, you guessed it, one penny. The Two Penny Post was established in 1801.

 

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London Plaques – Part 2

In this occasional series on London plaques, the first remembers John Peake Knight, an engineer from Nottingham who was a railway manager and inventor of the world’s first traffic lights.

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London Plaques – Part 1

One of the things I keep an eye out for on my travels is plaques, be they official blue or green or otherwise, and London has an abundance of them. Often I’ll recognise the name even if I don’t know a lot about them but I’ll also stumble across an intriguing plaque that leads me to do more research. As such this will be a continuing series, focusing on plaques found in London and the history behind them, from the well-known to the more obscure.

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Dr Johnson’s House

Dr Johnson’s House is the 300 year old townhouse where Samuel Johnson lived and worked compiling his dictionary. Built by Richard Gough, a wool merchant, his is the only house to have survived from that time, including being damaged during the Blitz. It is nestled away down side streets off Fleet Street and it was a little tricky to find, though this could equally have been down to me paying more attention to photographing the area as it was to a surprising lack of signage.

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Nottingham: The Plaque Addition – Part One

Continuing the theme of Nottingham architecture, this post explores some of the plaques in the city dedicated to people or significant events. As I’m discovering a lot lately, I’ve passed by many of these without noticing them before.

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Leighton House Museum

Leighton House Museum  is the only purpose built studio house open to the public, being the home of Frederick Leighton, a Victorian artist. He had the house designed to his precise requirements as a place where he could work, house his collections of art and receive visitors, which included Queen Victoria.

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Tyburn Convent

On my last trip to London I decided to head out to Marble Arch and take a photograph of the Tyburn Tree plaque which marks the site where the famous gallows were located. It was while researching its exact location that I discovered the existence of Tyburn Convent which houses a crypt with relics of the martyrs who died at Tyburn.

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