Posts Tagged With: london

Throwback Thursday: General Francisco de Miranda Statue, Fitzroy Square, London

The Venezuelan Francisco de Miranda lived at 58 Grafton Way between 1802 to 1810 and it became the centre of South American revolutionary meetings. The statue is a copy of one made by the Venezuelan sculptor Rafael de la Cova and was placed here in 1990. He’s described on the sculpture as the precursor of Latin American independence and that he died a prisoner in Spain (in 1816).

Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Throwback Thursday: Mary Queen of Scots House, London

In the early 20th century Scottish landowner and politician Sir John Tollemache Sinclair acquired the land at 143-144 Fleet Street and in 1905 commissioned architect Richard Mauleverer Roe to design a Neo-Gothic office.

Continue reading
Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Square, London

With some time to kill while in the area (pre-COVID) I ventured into Holy Trinity Church which was designated as the Cathedral of the Arts and Crafts Movement by Sir John Betjeman. The message of the movement (members included William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones) was to revere nature through crafts, painting and architecture as demonstrated by the church which was designed by John Dando Sedding in 1888.

Continue reading
Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Highgate Cemetery East

Unlike Highgate Cemetery West, the East side is self-guided – you are given a map which marks the most notable people buried there and then left to explore at leisure. The East Cemetery was opened by the London Cemetery Company in 1860. The aim of the cemetery was to maximise space, which is why it was designed with less ornate decoration and buildings then the West Cemetery.

Continue reading

Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Billingsgate Roman House and Baths

I visited Billingsgate Roman House and Baths as part of Open House London. There was a small queue to get in, as numbers down to the remains have to be restricted but it passed quickly and we were given an interesting talk about the remains while we waited. First discovered in 1848, outside of the arrangements for Open House London they can be visited at only certain times between April and November, so do check their website before making a visit.

Continue reading

Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

St Botolph without Aldgate Church, London

There’s been a church on this site since at least 1125, but the present church dates from 1744 and is by George Dance the Elder (he also built Mansion House, the official home of the Lord Mayor of London). The interior of the church, which really took my breath away, was remodelled by John Francis Bently (who also designed Westminster Cathedral).

Continue reading

Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Throwback Thursday: Bus Art, Westminster

In 2014 Transport for London, along with businesses and artists created an art trail to celebrate the iconic London bus. All the sculptures were to be auctioned off for charity in 2015 but at least one, Westminster Bus by Jenny Leonard, was still in place in late 2016 when I took these photos.

Continue reading

Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Throwback Thursday: Westminster Cathedral, London

On one of my walks through Westminster I passed by Westminster Cathedral, one of those buildings designed to take your breath away. I didn’t have time to go inside but it has been placed firmly on my to revisit list.

Continue reading

Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Throwback Thursday: The Royal Masonic Trust for Boys and Girls

This building in London used to house the Royal Masonic Trust for Boys and Girls, a charitable children’s organisation that still has offices further down the street.

 

Continue reading

Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Throwback Thursday: Cheniston Lodge

This striking looking building is Cheniston Lodge in Kensington, designed in the Queen Anne style and dating from 1885. During the Second World War it was used as an Air Raid precaution store and depot and then converted to a Register Office, and now appears to have returned to being a home. Interestingly the Lodge itself was built on the site of what had been the Catholic University College, set up by Thomas Capel in 1874 to provide higher education to Catholics who were banned at the time from attending Oxford and Cambridge. The site was sold off in 1879 as the University’s experiment ended in failure, mostly due to lack of funds.

Categories: England, London | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.