Posts Tagged With: statue

Lotherton Chapel

Lotherton Chapel is a small building dating to the 12th century that is next to Lotherton Hall in Leeds. It fell into disrepair until 1913 when Colonel Gascoigne, the then owner of the Hall, had it refurbished to be used as a family chapel, though it is still Church of England property.

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Special Operations Executive Memorial, London

The Special Operations Executive, headquartered in London, was formed in the Second World War to secretly recruit men and women who would perform acts of sabotage in countries occupied by Germany. The lengths that these brave men and women went through is truly remarkable and I’ve read a fair few biographies of some of the women recruited – I’d recommend A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Who Helped Win World War II by Sonia Purnell.

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Burghley House: Garden of Surprises

Opened in 2007 the Garden of Surprises was influenced by the garden that William Cecil, the first owner of Burghley House, had created in his Hertfordshire home, Theobalds. It was common for Elizabethan gardens to have “tricks” such as mazes, statues, grottos, concealed water pipes to shoot out water etc. all of which can be found in this modern version.

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Categories: England, Lincolnshire | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

Throwback Thursday: Exchange Newsroom War Memorial, Liverpool

This is another monument that stands in a recess of Exchange Flags. The statue is a memorial to the members of the Liverpool Exchange Newsroom who died during the First World War and depicts soldiers ready for battle and a nurse tending to a wounded soldier. Britannia is above overseeing events.

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Throwback Thursday: Nelson Monument, Liverpool

The Nelson Monument stands in the open area in front of Exchange Flags. It’s an imposing and rather striking creation, crowded with figures of a soldier, angel and skeleton as well as Nelson himself on top, with four chained people depicted below. It was sculpted by Sir Richard Westmacott with a design by Matthew Cotes Wyatt and was unveiled in 1813, making it the first public sculpture to be erected in the city.

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Throwback Thursday: Boadicea and Her Daughters Sculpture, Westminster Bridge, London

Representing Boadicea (or Boudica or Boudicca or any other manner of spellings), the queen of a British Iceni tribe who led an uprising against the Romans in AD 60-61, this sculpture can be found by Westminster Bridge opposite Big Ben. It was created by Thomas Thornycroft with help from his son William and was commissioned in the 1850s but not completed until 1898, over ten years after the sculptor had died. It was installed at the bridge in 1902.

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Canons Ashby – The Gardens

The gardens at Canons Ashby present a lovely first impression of the estate. Edward Dryden, beginning in 1908, was largely responsible for the development of the gardens as it looks today. He wanted to create an organised landscape of geometric shapes.

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Throwback Thursday: Vrouw met Stola (Woman with stole), Amsterdam

This lovely statue was created by Pieter d’Hont and was placed here next to the Singel Canal in 1996. She’s apparently inspired by someone the artist knew and he’d made several copies by the time this one was part of a sculpture route around the city and then later moved to its present location.

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Throwback Thursday: Bowtell’s “My Children” Statue, Duke of York Square, London

This statue, known as both “My Children” and “Two Pupils”, represents children from the Royal Military Asylum that was based at the Duke Of York’s Square, London. It’s full title was the Royal Military Asylum for the Children of Soldiers of the Regular Army and mostly educated children who were orphans or who had fathers serving overseas.

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The Garden Museum, London

I’ve walked by the Garden Museum a few times whilst in London and when I found myself with an afternoon free I decided it was the perfect time to visit. I was largely prompted by their temporary exhibit at the time – on until 19 June – called Wild & Cultivated: Fashioning the Rose.

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