London

London Architecture – Part One

These buildings on Courtfield Road in Kensington, now very nice looking flats, were built by J.R. and W.H. Roberts in May 1880 and designed by Walter Graves. The section pictured would have been the “lesser rooms” with the nicest section facing the gardens at the back (which I didn’t think to investigate at the time). You can find the original floor plans and more details here.

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London Plaques – Part 3

Here’s another post about some of the plaques to be found around London. The first is on the site of the Westminster office of the Penny Post, on Gerrard Street, the first building to operate as a post office in Westminster in 1794. The London Penny Post itself was established in 1680 to deliver mail around London for, you guessed it, one penny. The Two Penny Post was established in 1801.

 

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The Albert Pub, Victoria

Named after Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s consort, the Albert Pub in Victoria is a Grade II listed building noted for its exterior decor. It’s built on the site of an earlier pub called The Blue Coat Boy and was built in around 1862. Many of the features, including the wrought iron balconies, are original.

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Parliament Square, London

Parliament Square is just to the northwest of the Houses of Parliament, a patch of greenery notable for its statues. It was created in 1868 and redesigned again in 1950. There are eleven statues on the square, only a few of which I will showcase here. I wasn’t able to photograph them all due to the sizeable crowds of tourists taking their own photos.

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London Plaques – Part 2

In this occasional series on London plaques, the first remembers John Peake Knight, an engineer from Nottingham who was a railway manager and inventor of the world’s first traffic lights.

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London Sculptures – Part One

Another semi-regular series here, featuring sculptures I’ve admired on my walks around London.

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Golden Jubilee Sundial, London

Just across from the Houses of Parliament in the Old Palace Yard is the Golden Jubilee Sundial. This was a gift from Parliament to the Queen to celebrate her Golden Jubilee. It is an analemmatic sundial which means it is horizontal and has a vertical gnomon (the part of the sundial that casts a shadow) – in this case the head of the person standing on the appropriate dateline.

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London Plaques – Part 1

One of the things I keep an eye out for on my travels is plaques, be they official blue or green or otherwise, and London has an abundance of them. Often I’ll recognise the name even if I don’t know a lot about them but I’ll also stumble across an intriguing plaque that leads me to do more research. As such this will be a continuing series, focusing on plaques found in London and the history behind them, from the well-known to the more obscure.

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Tube Stations – Part 1

I very rarely take photos of tube stations when I’m down in London as usually I’m too busy heading away from them or the exits are too crowded for me to want to wade through to get a good photo. That being said sometimes I do manage it and this is the first in an occasional series, amalgamating several trips to London.

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Westminster Sculptures

There are more than 400 public artworks in the City of Westminster, and this post explores just a small fraction of those which I photographed on my last visit to London. The first is the Monument to the Women of World War II which effectively displays the different jobs women undertook during the war, represented by the different uniforms they would have worn. Designed by John W Mills and unveiled by the Queen in 2005, the writing on the side is the same font as that used on war-time ration books.

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