Posts Tagged With: Lord Byron

St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall

St Mary Magdalene Church has been on my local must list visit for a number of years and I finally managed it in September. It is most notable for being the burial place of both Lord Byron and his daughter, the mathematician Ada Lovelace.

We received a very warm welcome from two of the volunteers who throughout our visit were very accommodating and chatted to me about the church, providing some extra details about the history of the building. The church does however have a lot of information boards about Byron, Ada and other figures connected to the church, as well as QR codes making it possible to work your way around several “trails” depending on who you want to focus on.

The building itself is on the site of an old Saxon church, the porch dating from 1320 and the tower built in stages between the 12th and 14th centuries. Much of the rest of the building dates from 1872.

The church has many claims to fame. The first of course is as the burial place of Lord Byron and in the baptistery there are many objects related to him including this quite impressive plaque and statue.

One of the other claims to fame is as the burial ground of Ada Lovelace, Byron’s only legitimate daughter, a mathematician who is credited with having written the first computer programme. Byron and her mother separated shortly after her birth and so she never knew her father. She did however remain fascinated with him though her mother steered her towards more scientific subjects rather than poetical. She died of cancer aged 36 in 1852 and was the last member of the family to be buried in the vault, at her own request. What you see of the tomb isn’t actually that impressive, as the coffin is actually beneath the church, but interesting to see nonetheless.

Another claim to fame is that St Mary Magdalene has a large collection of stained glass windows by Charles Eamer Kempe a renowned Victorian designer.

Definitely worth a visit. You can see some more photos here.

 

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Newark Museum

The Newark Museum can be found inside the National Civil War Centre and spans a few rooms with displays of items that are in some way connected to the town. The most stunning piece there must be the Newark torc, found by metal detector Maurice Richardson in 2005 near the River Trent. Made from rolled gold wires twisted into eight ropes they would have been traded or given as gifts between tribes around 200-50BC.

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Nottingham: The Plaque Addition – Part One

Continuing the theme of Nottingham architecture, this post explores some of the plaques in the city dedicated to people or significant events. As I’m discovering a lot lately, I’ve passed by many of these without noticing them before.

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Newstead Abbey Part 2: The Gardens

During my recent visit to Newstead Abbey I wanted to make sure I saw as much of the gardens as possible, though not all – since they cover more than 300 acres! I decided the best way of accomplishing this was by following the route on the map I had purchased from the Abbey Gift Shop. Although there have been gardens on the site since the times of the priory, the current layout owes much of its design to the later owners, such as the Byrons and the Wildmans.

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Newstead Abbey Part 1: The House

On another gloriously sunny day in May I decided to head out to Newstead Abbey, the poet Lord Byron’s ancestral home (although he actually only lived there from 1808-1814). Founded as the Augustinian Priory of St Mary by Henry II in the 12th century, it was converted into a house by the poet’s ancestor Sir John Byron in 1540 after Henry VIII dissolved the monastery. All that remains of the Priory Church is the below section, although much of the original structure and monastic layout remained when the house was designed.

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