Posts Tagged With: church

Throwback Thursday: The Guild Church of St Margaret Pattens, London

St Margaret Pattens is a church near the Monument to the Great Fire of London. The current building was designed by Sir Christopher Wren in 1687 though records date a previous church on the site from 1067.

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Throwback Thursday: All Saint’s Parish Church, Leamington Spa

Built in 1842 this Grade II listed church designed in the Gothic Revival Style, is close to Jephson Gardens and the Royal Pump Rooms. It is one of England’s largest parish churches.

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Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Square, London

With some time to kill while in the area (pre-COVID) I ventured into Holy Trinity Church which was designated as the Cathedral of the Arts and Crafts Movement by Sir John Betjeman. The message of the movement (members included William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones) was to revere nature through crafts, painting and architecture as demonstrated by the church which was designed by John Dando Sedding in 1888.

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Glasgow Cathedral

Glasgow Cathedral is the oldest cathedral on mainland Scotland, the present building being consecrated in 1197. It’s a large impressive stone building with very high ceilings next to the Necropolis.

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St Mary Abbots Church, London

St Mary Abbots Church on Kensington High Street was built in 1872 and designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott (architect of the Midland Grand Hotel at St Pancras and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office among many others), though church buildings had been on the site before then.

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Christ Church, Spitalfields

I wandered into Christ Church, Spitalfields mostly to shelter from a sudden downpour. Built between 1714 and and 1719 it was designed by Nicholas Hawksmoor who worked alongside Christopher Wren. It was one of the first “commissioners’ churches” which had been established by Act of Parliament in 1711 to build fifty new churches for London’s expanding population.

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St Lawrence Jewry next Guildhall, London

St Lawrence Jewry is another church I visited as part of Open House London. It’s the official church of the City of London Corporation. There’s been a church here from 1136 though the current building is at least the third one on the site. It’s name comes from its historical location next to where a Jewish community lived and is next to the Guildhall building (to feature in a later post).

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St Vedast-Alias-Foster Church, London

I hadn’t heard of St Vedast-alias-Foster before I noticed it was forming part of Open House London last year. It’s dedicated to a French saint who was Bishop of Arras around the 6th century.

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St Mary-le-Bow Church, London

A church has probably been on the site of St Mary-le-Bow since Saxon times but the present building was one of the first churches to be rebuilt after the Great Fire of London by Christopher Wren. According to tradition you have to have been born within the sound of the bells of Mary-le-Bow to be considered a true Cockney.

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St Stephen Walbrook Church, London

St Stephen Walbrook is another church I visited whilst down in London for Open House last year. It’s the third church building on the site, the first was founded in Saxon times, the second was destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666 and the third was designed by Christopher Wren in 1672.

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