Posts Tagged With: stained glass

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

Liverpool Cathedral is the largest cathedral in Britain and fifth largest in the world, built between 1904 and 1978. It was designed by Giles Gilbert Scott, perhaps most famous for designing the iconic red telephone box.

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Beaumaris Castle

Beaumaris Castle on the Isle of Anglesey in North Wales was another castle, like Caernarfon to be built by Edward I. Construction began in 1295 but stopped around 1300 with the castle unfinished.

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Merchant Adventurer’s Hall, York

The Merchant Adventurer’s Hall is a Grade I listed timber framed building built in around 1357 by a fraternity of York citizens as a charity and business that became the Company of Merchant Adventurers of York in the 16th century.

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Throwback Thursday: St Leonard’s Church, Wollaton

St Leonard’s Church in Wollaton, Nottingham, has been around since the 1200s and it would have fallen under the care of the Mortein and then the Willoughby families, owners of the nearby Wollaton Hall.

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York Minster

York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in Northern Europe and more than half of Europe’s medieval stained glass is in its windows. The first church on the site dates from around 627 but the present building dates from around 1220.

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Heathcote Buildings, Nottingham

The Heathcote Buildings were erected in 1881 from a design by the Nottingham architects Walker and Howitt. Then, as now, it was built with shops in mind, though the top floor was a lace warehouse.

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Paycocke’s House and Garden

Paycocke’s House and Garden is a National Trust property in Coggeshall, Essex. The house was built in 1509 by Thomas Paycocke, a wealthy cloth merchant, one of the richest men in Coggeshall. The wool Paycocke produced, known as Coggeshall white, was said to be one of the best cloths in the country.

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Charlecote Park

Charlecote Park is an impressive 16th century National Trust property on the banks of the River Avon in Warwickshire. Not only are the interiors beautifully decorated, but it is surrounded by a deer park where we were fortunate to get quite close to the deer, and the River Avon is literally on its door step.

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Dr Johnson’s House

Dr Johnson’s House is the 300 year old townhouse where Samuel Johnson lived and worked compiling his dictionary. Built by Richard Gough, a wool merchant, his is the only house to have survived from that time, including being damaged during the Blitz. It is nestled away down side streets off Fleet Street and it was a little tricky to find, though this could equally have been down to me paying more attention to photographing the area as it was to a surprising lack of signage.

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Tyburn Convent

On my last trip to London I decided to head out to Marble Arch and take a photograph of the Tyburn Tree plaque which marks the site where the famous gallows were located. It was while researching its exact location that I discovered the existence of Tyburn Convent which houses a crypt with relics of the martyrs who died at Tyburn.

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