Posts Tagged With: art gallery

The Wallace Collection, London

Back in May I went to the Wallace Collection to visit the Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts exhibition. In collaboration with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art this exhibition, which finished recently, focused on how 18th century French art influenced Disney animators, particularly for the original Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast. I enjoyed the exhibit, particularly the hand drawings of the transformation of Cinderella’s dress from rags, and the audioguide which was included in the £14 for adults admission price was really well done. Somewhat inevitably photography wasn’t allowed in the exhibition. Photography is allowed however in the Wallace Collection itself, which is free to enter.

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Throwback Thursday: MOSTYN Art Gallery, Llandudno

MOSTYN Art Gallery – the building on the right in the below picture – is a contemporary art gallery in Llandudno, Wales. The history of the gallery begins in 1895 in Conwy with the Gwynedd Ladies’ Art Society. They asked the philanthropist and photographer Lady Augusta Mostyn to secure new premises for them and this building became the home of the society from 1901 to 1903. Women were not permitted in the male artist’s societies so this is possibly the first art gallery dedicated to exclusively exhibiting work by female artists in the world. Interestingly that wasn’t the original intention of Lady Augusta who wanted it to be a space for local people to use (many of the Society members were actually based elsewhere in the UK) and eventually the Society was asked to leave.

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Martine Hamilton Knight: Pevsner on Camera, Djanogly Gallery, Nottingham

On until 28 August this exhibition by Nottingham based architectural photographer Martine Hamilton Knight features buildings from around Nottinghamshire, part of the newly updated Pevsner guide by historian Clare Hartnell. Nikolaus Pevsner came to England from Germany in 1933 and created the Buildings of England series of county guides, still an important go to guide for architectural insights – I often refer to them when I’m researching architectural posts. I always think taking photos of photos is a bit redundant but I did take some at the exhibition, a couple of which are places that I’d like to see in person. The first is from St Mary’s Church in Clifton.

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Ancient Iraq: New Discoveries Exhibition, Djanogly Gallery, Nottingham

On until 19th June this free exhibition at the Djanogly Gallery on the University of Nottingham campus is on tour from the British Museum. It’s aim is to highlight the challenges of protecting Iraq’s cultural heritage following decades of conflict. It had some very interesting objects on display such as this statue of Gudea who was the king of Girsu, one of Ancient Iraq’s earliest cities. Gudea had the statue of himself placed in one of the city’s temples as evidence that he worshipped the gods.

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Throwback Thursday: Numen (Shifting Votive One & Two) by Thomas J Price, London

Just by the Leadenhall Building in London were a series of sculptures of heads. Made of aluminium they are the sculptor’s exploration of Greek, Roman and Egyptian traditions for the 21st century. They were part of the Sculpture in the City programme, an annual sculpture park that uses London streets as its gallery. You can learn more about the programme and this year’s sculptures here. The heads are currently on display at Hauser & Wirth Gallery in Somerset.

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Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow

The main reason I wanted to visit Glasgow last October was to go to the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum and it turned out to be an even better experience than I’d been expecting, in fact I ended up spending most of the day there. The building itself is beautiful inside and out, designed in a Spanish Baroque style in red sandstone by John W. Simpson and E. J. Milner Allen and opened in 1901.

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The Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow

I’m not a big fan of modern art as regular readers will know but Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art is free to explore and I was intrigued by the history of the building itself. The gallery was opened in 1966 but the building dates from 1778 when it was the townhouse of William Cunninghame a tobacco merchant and slave trader.

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Nottingham Light Night 2020

Another February, another Light Night. This is always a good event to go to every year and as ever the city centre was packed with people from all ages. For this year as well the event was spread over both the Friday and the Saturday night, though I only made it out on the Friday. There’s never enough time to see everything so we did a loop from Trinity Square to listen to some of the choirs, round through Market Square to the very impressive art works projected onto the Council House, over to St Mary’s Church in the Lace Market and then up to Nottingham Contemporary art gallery. A few of my favourite light displays are below.

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Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

I’d never really spent a lot of time at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery so I decided to rectify that one day last year. The BMAG first opened in 1885 and is a large Grade II* listed building that was a little hard to appreciate on my visit as construction work was going on all around it (the below photo was taken some years previously).

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The Royal Academy of Arts, London

The Royal Academy of Arts is based in Burlington House, a 17th century mansion. Construction began in 1664; the plot of land had been given to Sir John Denham, Charles II’s Surveyor of the Office of Works, as thanks for his loyalty to the King. Renovations to the exterior and interior took place over the years with the third Earl of Burlington in particular inspired by Italian architecture.

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