Posts Tagged With: art

The Wallace Collection, London

Back in May I went to the Wallace Collection to visit the Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts exhibition. In collaboration with New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art this exhibition, which finished recently, focused on how 18th century French art influenced Disney animators, particularly for the original Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast. I enjoyed the exhibit, particularly the hand drawings of the transformation of Cinderella’s dress from rags, and the audioguide which was included in the £14 for adults admission price was really well done. Somewhat inevitably photography wasn’t allowed in the exhibition. Photography is allowed however in the Wallace Collection itself, which is free to enter.

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Throwback Thursday: Numen (Shifting Votive One & Two) by Thomas J Price, London

Just by the Leadenhall Building in London were a series of sculptures of heads. Made of aluminium they are the sculptor’s exploration of Greek, Roman and Egyptian traditions for the 21st century. They were part of the Sculpture in the City programme, an annual sculpture park that uses London streets as its gallery. You can learn more about the programme and this year’s sculptures here. The heads are currently on display at Hauser & Wirth Gallery in Somerset.

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Throwback Thursday: Eye-I by Bruce McLean, 199 Bishopgate, London

This abstract female face is by Glasgow born Bruce McLean and can be found outside 199 Bishopgate in London. Created in 1993 the title apparently refers to Glasgow’s “aye-aye” greeting. Made of steel it really is a fun addition to the surroundings.

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Throwback Thursday: Awakening Statue, London

This statue of a female nude called Awakening can be found in Ropers Garden on Chelsea Embankment. She was sculpted by Gilbert Ledward in around 1923.

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Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow

The main reason I wanted to visit Glasgow last October was to go to the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum and it turned out to be an even better experience than I’d been expecting, in fact I ended up spending most of the day there. The building itself is beautiful inside and out, designed in a Spanish Baroque style in red sandstone by John W. Simpson and E. J. Milner Allen and opened in 1901.

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Glasgow Street Art

Glasgow is renowned for its impressive street art and while I didn’t go on one of the many walking tours of the artwork available I did take some time one afternoon to seek some of them out. A few of my favourites are below.

The above, unofficially titled St Mungo, is probably the one I’ve seen the most shared around social media but it really is a stunning piece and definitely worth seeing in person to take in all the details close up. Completed in 2016 it’s by the artist Smug.

Another one of Smug’s work is this beautiful wildlife scene overlooking Ingram Street car park. Tricky to pick a favourite but the badgers are particularly adorable. I love the way it looks like you’re peering through holes in the wall.

Created for his 75th birthday by the artist Rogue One this is a great portrait of Billy Connolly that you can find in Osborne Street.

Another one of Smug’s works is this image of a girl with a magnifying glass not far from Glasgow Central Station.

You can find more photos of Glasgow’s street art here.

 

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The Royal Academy of Arts, London

The Royal Academy of Arts is based in Burlington House, a 17th century mansion. Construction began in 1664; the plot of land had been given to Sir John Denham, Charles II’s Surveyor of the Office of Works, as thanks for his loyalty to the King. Renovations to the exterior and interior took place over the years with the third Earl of Burlington in particular inspired by Italian architecture.

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The Foreign and Commonwealth Office Building

Back in September I attended my first Open House London weekend which was fantastic and I managed to see everything I wanted to and more. The one place that I absolutely wanted to visit was the Foreign and Commonwealth Office building so I headed there near its opening time and after a brief security check I got in without having to queue – not the situation when I left as the queue then was starting to skirt around the building.

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The Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

Back in June I went to Liverpool for three nights. The main reason for my visit was to go to the Terracotta Warriors exhibition at the World Museum (more of which in a later post) but the first place I visited on arrival in the city was The Walker Art Gallery. One of the largest collections of artwork outside London it began in 1819 when the Liverpool Royal Institute bought 37 paintings from the collection of local philanthropist William Roscoe.

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#Hoodwinked2018 Art Trail

On Sunday I decided to go and photograph as many of the  Hoodwinked: A Twist in the Tale art trail figures as I could; there are 33 in total and I managed around 25 or so before deciding that at 28C it was getting a bit too hot for me to comfortably continue walking around the city centre so I’ll pick up the ones I’m missing in the next few weeks. The trail of colourful robins is here until September when they will be auctioned off to raise funds for the Nottinghamshire Hospice – they are also raising funds through the official app, and apparently a souvenir guide which I haven’t seen yet but intend to purchase when I’m next near the Tourist Centre. Each design is really well done and represents a certain aspect of Nottingham that will be fun for locals and hopefully entertaining for visitors. The idea is that Robin has donned all these different disguises in order to outwit the dastardly Sheriff of Nottingham (below, painted in a homage to Alan Rickman’s Sheriff of Nottingham).

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