Posts Tagged With: stained glass window

St Philip’s Church, Kensington

I popped into St Philip’s Church in Kensington purely because I was passing and saw the door was open. The building dates from around 1857, being consecrated in 1858.

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St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall

St Mary Magdalene Church has been on my local must list visit for a number of years and I finally managed it in September. It is most notable for being the burial place of both Lord Byron and his daughter, the mathematician Ada Lovelace.

We received a very warm welcome from two of the volunteers who throughout our visit were very accommodating and chatted to me about the church, providing some extra details about the history of the building. The church does however have a lot of information boards about Byron, Ada and other figures connected to the church, as well as QR codes making it possible to work your way around several “trails” depending on who you want to focus on.

The building itself is on the site of an old Saxon church, the porch dating from 1320 and the tower built in stages between the 12th and 14th centuries. Much of the rest of the building dates from 1872.

The church has many claims to fame. The first of course is as the burial place of Lord Byron and in the baptistery there are many objects related to him including this quite impressive plaque and statue.

One of the other claims to fame is as the burial ground of Ada Lovelace, Byron’s only legitimate daughter, a mathematician who is credited with having written the first computer programme. Byron and her mother separated shortly after her birth and so she never knew her father. She did however remain fascinated with him though her mother steered her towards more scientific subjects rather than poetical. She died of cancer aged 36 in 1852 and was the last member of the family to be buried in the vault, at her own request. What you see of the tomb isn’t actually that impressive, as the coffin is actually beneath the church, but interesting to see nonetheless.

Another claim to fame is that St Mary Magdalene has a large collection of stained glass windows by Charles Eamer Kempe a renowned Victorian designer.

Definitely worth a visit. You can see some more photos here.

 

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Liverpool Parish Church

On my final day in Liverpool I decided to take a walk down from my hotel towards the Albert Dock in order to visit the museums there but the first building I actually stepped inside was the Liverpool Parish Church.

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Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

Liverpool Cathedral is the largest cathedral in Britain and fifth largest in the world, built between 1904 and 1978. It was designed by Giles Gilbert Scott, perhaps most famous for designing the iconic red telephone box.

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The Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam is another place that was on my must visit list (also included in the I amsterdam card) and I ended up visiting it straight after the Van Gogh Museum (they are located very close together). Originally I’d planned to visit the Rijksmuseum later in the day as the museum states that lunchtime is the busiest time of day but seeing as it was very hot but raining buckets I decided to go in at lunchtime anyways so as to be out of the rain and found that I could walk straight in without having to queue after all.

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Merchant Adventurer’s Hall, York

The Merchant Adventurer’s Hall is a Grade I listed timber framed building built in around 1357 by a fraternity of York citizens as a charity and business that became the Company of Merchant Adventurers of York in the 16th century.

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Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle is an impressively large fortress that sits above the city on Castle Rock. There’s been a royal castle on the site since at least the 12th century, with it continuing to be a royal residence until 1633.

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Throwback Thursday: The Adams Building, Nottingham

The Adams Building is one of my favourite buildings in Nottingham, a Grade II listed Victorian lace warehouse dating from 1855 which was designed by Thomas Chambers Hine, one of Nottingham’s best architects. During Open Heritage weekend last year we were able to go on a free tour of the building led by an architect from the company who helps preserve the building, which proved to be a intriguing warren of rooms and spiral staircases.

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St Maurice’s Church, Ellingham

On a recent holiday in Northumberland we based ourselves in the village of Ellingham, staying at the Pack Horse Inn (highly recommended – lovely staff, fantastic food). After checking in we decided to take a walk through the very small village and came across St Maurice’s Church.

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St Swithun’s Church, Worcester

Whilst visiting a friend in Worcester we came across the open door of St Swithun’s Church. Not always open to the public we decided to have an explore of what is a Grade I listed Anglican Church, one of the earliest Georgian churches in England.

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