Posts Tagged With: christopher wren

St Mary-at-Hill Church, London

St Mary-at-Hill was one of those churches I decided to pop in and visit while I was wandering around the Billingsgate area of London. The entrance is hidden away down a narrow street, handily marked by the sign below, and is far bigger inside than I’d been expecting.

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St Clement Danes Church, London

I’d taken photos of the exterior of St Clement Danes Church on a previous visit to London but I was finally able to spare the time to go inside in September. Right by the Royal Courts of Justice it is one of London’s two “island churches”, so-called because of the layout of the road around it. (The other is St Mary le Strand which will be the focus of a later post).

 

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Christchurch Greyfriars Church Garden

Not far from St Paul’s Cathedral is Christchurch Greyfriars Church Garden. It is the impressive ruins of one of Christopher Wren’s churches that was heavily damaged in the Blitz on 29 December 1940.

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St Bride’s Church, London

St Bride’s is one of the oldest churches in London, dating back over 2,000 years. The current building was designed by Christopher Wren in 1627. It’s probably most famous for its spire, said to have inspired a baker to make what is now the traditional tiered wedding cake.

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St Dunstan in the East

On the same day I visited the Monument to the Great Fire of London I walked a little further down the road until I came to St Dunstan in the East, a Church of England church built around 1100 that was badly damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666.

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The Monument to the Great Fire of London

The Monument was designed by Christopher Wren to commemorate the Great Fire of London which started in nearby Pudding Lane on 2 September 1666. The Monument is 202 feet high, the exact distance between it and where the fire began.

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