Berwick-upon-Tweed Barracks and Main Guard

Berwick-upon-Tweed Barracks and Main Guard is an English Heritage property which was built in the early 18th century as a barracks and was one of the first in England to be purpose built.

The design of the barracks was adopted from the plans of Nicholas Hawksmoor whose work was considered too flamboyant and so modified by Captain Thomas Phillips, a military engineer. The front entrance is original and displays the coat of arms of George I.

Inside are three separate areas – The King’s Own Scottish Borderers Museum, the Berwick Museum and Art Gallery and the Berwick Gymnasium Art Gallery. As we were only paying a flying visit to Berwick-upon-Tweed we only had time to visit the Scottish Borderers Museum.

The Regiment was raised in March 1689 as a defence of Edinburgh against the Jacobites. In 2006 they were incorporated into the Royal Regiment of Scotland and the museum commemorates their work since their founding. Of particular interest was the range of medals on display.

Other items include the uniforms the regiment wore throughout the years.

Another interesting artifact was this coconut which had been carved by Lt Richard Hockings during his imprisonment by the French in 1796.

One cute little addition was this Sooty toy who had been the mascot of No. 3 Company, 2/52 Lowland Volunteers. He had served loyally in Iraq and Afghanistan and is now enjoying his retirement.

There are lots of interesting items on display including from more modern engagements and it proved to be a very informative place that we wished we had more time to fully explore. You can find more photos here.

Categories: Berwick-upon-Tweed, England, Northumberland | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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